Queen's Park: 150 Years

  • A statue of Queen Victoria by Marshall Wood, located on the grounds from 1871-74
    A statue of Queen Victoria by Marshall Wood, located on the grounds from 1871-74. Photo by A.R. Blackburn, 187-  ©Toronto Public Library, T11675
  • Queen’s Park has been a place of many public gathering in its history, such as this Gala Day event in the early 20th Century.

    Queen’s Park has been a place of many public gathering in its history, such as this Gala Day event in the early 20th Century.
    © Legislative Assembly of Ontario

     

On a rainy day in September 1860, Prince Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII), arrived by carriage to the north end of Toronto to open officially a new park on behalf of his mother, Queen Victoria. Thousands watched as the Prince laid the foundation stone of a future monument to the Queen, and cheered when they heard the name of the new public space – Queen’s Park. 150 years later, despite its location at the heart of a bustling city, Queen’s Park remains a green-space that draws people for gatherings, recreation and relaxation. It is an oasis where one can catch a glimpse of a swooping hawk, watch a busy squirrel, or contemplate Ontario’s history through the many plaques and monuments dotting the grounds.